Engines of War by Christian Wolmar: How wars were won and lost on the railways

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article thumb - Christian Wolmar Talk Wed-30-Nov

Christian Wolmar Talk Wed-30-Nov

Summary

Christian Wolmar is an award-winning writer and broadcaster specialising in transport and is the author of a series of books on railway history.

Date & time

Date:30 November 2022

Time:7.30pm to 9pm

Event Details

Address:Norwegian Church
1 St. Olav's Square
Albion St
Rotherhithe

Post code:SE16 7LN

Tickets:Only £3 (members attend free) including a soft drink in the interval

Telephone:07931 338959

Open hours:Mon - Fri, 09:00 - 17:00

Description

The nature of warfare changed radically in the 19th century. Contrast the Napoleonic Wars, with battles such as Waterloo that were decided in a day, with the prolonged and entrenched conflict that characterised the First World War a century later.

What brought about this remarkable change? The Napoleonic Wars were the last major battles fought before the crucial invention that transformed the very nature of how wars were conducted: the railways. Yet, this aspect of military history has been widely ignored. There has been much focus on how the development of weaponry increased the efficiency of armies as killing machines but little attention has been paid to how the weapons got to the front. And it was the railways which changed the logistics of war.

Transport

By Bus:Buses 47, 188, 381, C10, P12 stop outside

By Tube:5 mins from Rotherhithe tube (London Overground, frequent trains)

By Train:5 mins from Rotherhithe tube (London Overground, frequent trains)

Map

Accessibility

Access for wheelchair usersAccess for wheelchair users

If steps outside no more than 3If steps outside no more than 3

Level access toiletLevel access toilet

Seat availableSeat available

Accessible space, but please contact us beforehand

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