Young Blood: Knife Crime and Restorative Justice Discussion and Film Screening

Summary

article thumb - Image credit: Dhanesh Vaid

Image credit: Dhanesh Vaid

Join journalists, youth workers, experts, and activists for a roundtable discussion about knife crime and restorative justice, followed by a screening of 'Oresteia'.

Date

Starts: Tuesday 18:00
Ends: Tuesday 21:30
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Event Details

Address:London College of Communication
Elephant and Castle
London

Post code:SE1 6SB

Tickets:https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/young-blood-knife-crime-and-restorative-justice-roundtable-discussion-and-film-screening-tickets-59318259511

Telephone:020 7514 6500

Open hours:6-7.30pm: Knife crime and restorative justice – roundtable discussion
7.30-8pm: Break
8-9.30pm: Oresteia – film screening

Description

In response to a collaborative project for Visible Justice at London College of Communication, students chose to work on the subject of knife crime in London, with transmedia artist Poulomi Basu, to create an immersive film, ‘Young Blood’. Organisations and speakers include: #BikesUpKnivesDown InHouse Records Leyton Sixth Form College Dan Hancox – London journalist focusing on music, politics, cities and culture Alicia Hart – creative producer for London Needs You Alive Nic Madge – former judge, working with surgeons and psychologists on a campaign for blunt knives Vic Santaro – rap artist, actor and motivational speaker Ciaran Thapar – youth worker and writer This roundtable discussion aims to continue the dialogue with organisations interviewed by students for their film, including BikesUpKnivesDown, InHouse Records, and Leyton Sixth Form College. Participants were chosen because of their positive strategies to resist the ways in which young, often black, people from economically poor backgrounds are treated in a city that doesn’t always value them. We will produce questions for discussion that incorporate the necessity to look beyond the traditional perpetrator/victim binary, how young people are reclaiming a powerful culture of the city, and what kind of changes to existing legal and political frameworks are required. The format is entirely open – all audience members are invited to take a seat on the stage and speak. The event is convened by Max Houghton, Course Leader in Photojournalism and Documentary Photography at London College of Communication. ‘Oresteia’ screening: The discussion will be followed by a screening of ‘Oresteia’, a film by artist, photographer and London College of Communication Senior Lecturer Edmund Clark, created in collaboration with the men of HMP Grendon and the psychodrama department Grendon is Europe’s only wholly therapeutic prison, specialising in the rehabilitation of violent and sexually violent offenders. Men apply to Grendon from other prisons to undergo an intense process of group therapy. Research indicates that men who stay at Grendon for 18 months or more have significantly lower rates of reconviction. Edmund Clark will introduce his film and there will be time afterwards for a short Q&A. Running time: 73 minutes. Watch a clip of from ‘Oresteia’ on Vimeo. Copyright Edmund Clark, courtesy Ikon, Birmingham and Flowers Gallery London and New York. About Visible Justice: Visible Justice brings together artists, activists, journalists, civil liberties groups, human rights lawyers and media students for an exhibition and events programme exploring social justice in national and international contexts. Presented by London College of Communication’s Media School for its annual public showcase, Visible Justice will investigate the role of media technologies and collaborative partnerships in relation to such issues as climate change, displacement and persecution of refugees, knife crime, torture and rendition, state power, incarceration and the death penalty. Curated by artist David Birkin and writer and London College of Communication Course Leader Max Houghton, Visible Justice will feature immersive installation, photography, video, sound, and a series of talks, performances, screenings and events – all free and open to the public. Collaborative partners: Reprieve, PlanB, Poulomi Basu, David Blandy and Larry Achiampong, the Refugee Journalism Project. Full programme of events to follow. Free and open to all.

Transport

By Bus:Elephant & Castle is extremely well connected for buses across London that stop next to the College including: 1, 12, 35, 40, 45, 53, 63, 68, 100, 133, 136, 148, 155, 168, 171, 172, 176, 196, 188, 333, 343, 344, 360, 363, 415, 453, 468, C10 and P5. Visit the Transport for London website to plan your journey.

By Tube:Both the Bakerloo and Northern lines stop at Elephant & Castle underground station. The College is opposite the Elephant & Castle Shopping Centre, on the same side of the road as the Metropolitan Tabernacle. View the TFL tube map and plan your journey on the Transport for London website.

By Train:The College site is connected by Thameslink trains which stop at Elephant & Castle rail station, across the road from the College.

Accessibility

Access for wheelchair usersAccess for wheelchair users

Adapted toiletAdapted toilet

BrailleBraille

Disability trainingDisability awareness training received

Large print availableLarge print available

Level access toiletLevel access toilet

Positive about disabledPositive about disabled people