Housing

Affordable housing delivery breakdown

The tables below show the amount of affordable housing delivered between 2011/12 and 2016/17, in terms of the tenure breakdown for:

  • net affordable housing delivery - table 1.8
  • gross affordable housing delivery - table 1.9
  • net ten year re-cap of affordable homes delivery - table 1.10
  • affordable homes delivered  on schemes of ten residential units or more - table 1.11
  • affordable family homes delivered - table 1.12
  • affordable family homes delivered on schemes of ten residential units or more - table 1.13
  • long-term empty homes bought back into use - table 1.14

Note: Tables don't include long-term empty homes bought back into use, unless done so through the planning system, or when referred to in table 1.14.

Table 1.8 - Net Affordable Housing Delivery Tenure Breakdown

Net

Affordable breakdown

 Total affordable

Financial year

Social rented (%)

Intermediate (%)

Affordable rent (%)

Total

2011/12

459 (77)

134 (23)

N/A

593

2012/13

326 (67)

162 (33)

N/A

488

2013/14

299 (62)

160 (33)

24 (5)

483

2014/15

-121 (N/A)

169 (N/A)

61 (N/A)

109

2015/16

-165 (N/A)

154 (N/A)

132 (N/A)

121

2016/17

371 (67)

159 (29)

22 (4)

552

Total

1,169 (50)

938 (40)

239 (10)

 2,346

Average per year

195

156

40 391

You can find a comparison of total affordable homes against total housing delivery in net terms here.

Table 1.9 - Gross affordable housing delivery breakdown

Gross

Affordable breakdown

Total affordable

Financial year

Social rented (%)

Intermediate (%)

Affordable rent (%)

2011/12

498 (79)

134 (21)

N/A

632

2012/13

401 (71)

164 (29)

N/A

565

2013/14

320 (63)

160 (32)

24 (5)

504

2014/15

165 (42)

170 (43)

61 (15)

396

2015/16

216 (43)

156 (31)

132 (26)

504

2016/17

412 (69)

159 (27)

22 (4)

593

Total

2,012

943

239

3,194

Average per year

335

157

40 n/a

You can find a comparison of total affordable homes against total housing delivery in gross terms here.

Headlines

Over 1,160 (net) social rented homes have been delivered across the reporting period, equating to approximately 195 per year between 2011/12 and 2016/17. This represents 50% of all affordable homes delivered in the borough.

Over 930 intermediate and close to 240 affordable rent homes were delivered during the same period, representing 40% and 10% of total affordable homes delivered between 2011/12 and 2016/17.

Social rented homes

Over 1,160  social rented homes were delivered between 2011/12 and 2016/17 in net terms, while in gross terms over 2,000 social rented homes were delivered. This equates to approximately 195 (net) or 335(gross) social rented homes delivered each year across the reporting period.

The difference between total net and gross figures represents a total of approximately 848 social rented homes which were demolished on schemes which completed during the reporting period.

During the reporting years of 2014/15 and 2015/16, the net change in social rented homes saw a loss of 121 and 165 units, respectively. This is due to the way demolished housing units are recorded. Demolished housing units are recorded when the redevelopment on the same sites complete in their entirety (including any non-residential elements on the same site). 2014/15 was particularly affected due to some of the council’s estate regeneration schemes, such as those listed below, reaching full completion. Many of the new homes delivered on these sites would have been completed and counted in the financial years prior to 2014/15 during the reporting period, as and when they were completed. However, due to the lag time, the demolished units, which may have been demolished several years prior, were only counted in 2014/15 when the scheme completed in it’s entirety, including any non-residential elements. See below (table 1.10) for a ten year re-cap on net affordable housing delivery.

The completed schemes that contributed to a net loss of social housing during the 2014/15 include:

  • Trafalgar Place, SE17 (part of the former Heygate Estate regeneration programme)
  • Site C5 of Bermondsey Spa regeneration, SE1
  • Silwood Estate regeneration, SE16

2015/16 saw a net loss of social housing due to the completions of the sites within the Elmington Estate, formerly known as “sites A & B” and now known as “Camberwell Fields.” This scheme was built following partial implementation of the intial application for sites A & B completing in 2005 and around 2007, for 136 social rented units and a further 27 social rented units respectively (planning application reference number 00-CO-1614). The original blocks of this part of the Elmington Estate which contained the existing units on sites A & B were demolished  in the early 00s. These comprised 375 units, of which 369 were social rented. Across the completed redevelopment 442 new new homes have been delivered, of which 205 are for social rent and 21 were for affordable rent.

The estate regeneration schemes seek to provide more affordable homes across a wider area to create mixed communities with high quality new affordable and market homes that are “tenure blind.” This approach has been successful through the “early rehousing sites” for tenants of the former Heygate estate, which has seen a total of over 530 affordable homes completed in the local area, including close to 420 for social rent and 117 as intermediate units. The final scheme, on Stead Street, SE17, has seen 84 social rent homes completed during 2016/17.

2016/17 on the other hand has seen a net gain of 371 social rented units, a significant increase compared to the previous two years. This is due to the completion of several large schemes in the 2016/17 financial year.

Intermediate and affordable rent homes

As well as the 1,169 social rented homes delivered between 2011/12 and 2016/17, over 930 intermediate homes have been delivered in the borough, equating to approximately 156 per year. Intermediate homes usually come in the form of shared ownership, which work on a part-rent part-owner occupier basis and help meet the need of middle income households that cannot meet their housing need through the private housing market.

Affordable rent is defined by national government as a form of social rented housing. However, rents for this tenure are worked out using a different formula to and can be more expensive (up to 80% of market rents) than what most people traditionally associate with social rented homes (normally at the equivalent of between 30-40% of market rents). Therefore, it is important to distinguish between the two tenures.

Approximately 239 affordable rent units were delivered between 2013/14 and 2016/17. The majority of the affordable rent units were also capped at the Local Housing Allowance (the amount provided in Housing Benefit) to ensure they remain affordable to Southwark residents.

10 year affordable housing delivery

Due to the way the source database records demolitions and the long-term nature of large regeneration schemes, it is important to look at affordable housing delivery across a longer rather than shorter time period. For example, as well as the 1169 new social rented homes (of the 2346 net total affordable homes) delivered across the reported six year period, in the past 13 years between 2004/05 and 2016/17 over 2622 new social rented homes have been delivered, of a total close to 5822 new affordable homes.

Table 1.10 - Total net affordable housing delivery between 2004/05 and 2016/17

11 Year total (Net)

Social rent

Intermediate

Affordable rent

Total affordable

2004/05 to 2016/17

2,622

2,961

239

5,822

Affordable housing delivery against our 35% affordable housing policy

The following table gives a breakdown of amount of affordable housing delivered on-site for schemes of ten units or more.

Note: Figures are expressed in gross terms due to the minimum 35% affordable housing policy requirement being calculated on the gross delivery of new homes on a site. This means that if a developer gained planning permission for the demolition of 15 homes to provide 30 new homes, they'd be required to provide a minimum 35% affordable housing for 30 homes rather than 35% of the 15 net new homes.

Table 1.11 - Number of total affordable units against number of total homes on scheme of 10 units or more

Gross

Total units on >9 unit schemes

Affordable total (%)

Market (%)

Financial Year

2011/12

888

603 (67)

285 (33)

2012/13

919

535 (58)

384 (42)

2013/14

1,481

487 (33)

994 (67)

2014/15

1,220

388 (32)

832 (68)

2015/16

1,356

479 (35)

877 (65)

2016/17

2,278

592 (26)

1,686 (74)

Total

8,142

3,084 (38)

5,058 (62)

Average per year

1,357

514

843

Across the six year period, 38% of homes delivered on sites of ten units or more were affordable.

Our affordable housing policy seeks to ensure all developments of ten residential units or more delivers a minimum of 35% of the housing as affordable, preferably on-site. This is usually calculated on habitable rooms in order to maximise the proportion of the total housing given over to affordable housing (for example, six three bedroom affordable homes is overall more than six one bed affordable homes). The above figures in table 1.11 are reported on a unit-by-unit basis.

The source monitoring system doesn't currently record residential units in terms of their habitable rooms, making direct comparisons against our 35% policy requirement difficult. Similarly, for some sites, on-site affordable housing would not have been possible, and the off-site delivery or equivalent in-lieu payments invested in affordable housing delivery will not necessarily be reflected in the figures in table 1.11.

For the reasons above, the figures in table 1.11 shouldn't be used as a direct indicator of the successful implementation of our minimum 35% affordable housing policy-requirement. However, it provides a useful overview of the proportion of homes that are delivered as affordable homes on schemes of ten units or more on a unit-by-unit basis.

The following table, 1.12, provides a detailed breakdown of the amount of affordable homes by each tenure delivered across the four year reporting period on schemes of ten or more residential units.

Table 1.12 - Breakdown of affordable homes delivered on-site on schemes of ten units or more

Gross

Affordable breakdown

Affordable (all)

Financial year

Social rented (%)

Intermediate (%)

Affordable rent (%)

Affordable (all)

2011/12

475 (79)

128 (21)

N/A

603

2012/13

371 (69)

164 (31)

N/A

535

2013/14

310 (64)

160 (33)

17 (3)

487

2014/15

157 (40)

170 (44)

61 (16)

388

2015/16

200 (42)

156 (31)

123 (25)

479

2016/17

411 (69)

159 (12)

22 (4)

592

Total

1,924 (77)

937 (38)

223 (9)

3,084

Average per year

321

156

37

514

Across the six year reporting period, 77% of new affordable homes secured on-site on schemes of ten units or more have been social rented, equating to over 1,920 units 38% were intermediate, at close to 940 units while the remaining 9% were affordable rent 223 units.

This reflection on the percentage split on a unit-by-unit basis should be caveated. The proportion of affordable housing on new developments will normally have been calculated on a habitable room basis, as described above. Therefore, while useful, table 1.12 cannot be used as direct indicator of the success of our affordable housing policy.

Affordable family-sized homes tenure breakdown

Table 1.13 - Affordable family-sized homes - tenure breakdown

Gross

Family-sized affordable breakdown

Total affordable family-sized

Financial year

Social rented (%)

Intermediate (%)

Affordable rent (%)

2011/12

186 (98)

3 (2)

N/A

189

2012/13

114 (89)

14 (11)

N/A

128

2013/14

133 (84)

24 (15)

2 (1)

159

2014/15

81 (60)

34 (25)

20 (15)

135

2015/16

109 (89)

13 (10)

1 (1)

 

2016/17

171 (91)

15 (8)

1 (1)

187

Total

794

103 24 921

Average per year

132

17 4 154

85% of affordable family-sized homes have been for social rent. This is where housing need has been greatest in the borough according to our objective assessed housing need (see evidence base section). This equates to over 790 social rented family-sized homes delivered each year between 2011/12 and 2016/17.

Approximately 12% of affordable family homes have been intermediate, at 103 affordable family-sized intermediate homes. The remaining 3%, at 24 residential units, were delivered as affordable rent homes between 2013/14 and 2016/17.

Empty homes bought back into use

Grant money has previously been available to local authorities and housing associations to bring long-term empty homes back into use as affordable homes. Generally, these don't come back into use through the planning system and are therefore not referenced in tables 1.8 to 1.13 above.

However, the Mayor of London counts them as helping towards meeting borough’s prescribed housing target in the London Plan (see Annex Four of the London Plan and headline figures for total affordable homes delivered) and therefore we should count their contribution to overall affordable housing delivery in the borough.

Table 1.14 - Number of long-term empty homes bought back into use

Financial year

No. of homes

2011/12

112

2012/13

138

2013/14

156

2014/15

0

2015/16

0

Total

406

Average per year

81

Across the six year reporting period over 400 long term empty homes were bought back into use in the borough. Grant money for bringing long-term empty homes back into use has stopped being provided meaning no homes were able to be bought back into use during 2014/15 or 2015/16.

Page last updated: 24 May 2018